• From the Nahuatl xoconochtli: xococ means “sour” and nochtli means prickly pear fruit.
  • It is also called joconostle or soconostle.

The xoconostle is a plant found in semi-arid zones. There are around 15 varieties, the most common of which are known as cuaresmeño and burro. The seeds are in the middle of the fruit and are not edible.

This fruit can remain on the prickly pear up to a year without rotting. In Guanajuato and Querétaro sometimes it is added to spicy salsas and soups.

Xoconostles are classified according to their color and size. For example, the green xoconostle is known as cuaresmeño, the pink xoconostle is known as rosa de castilla (Castilian rose), and the red xoconostle is called sangre de toro (bull’s blood).

No

Nutricional Value: 

Xoconostle provides fiber, as well as vitamins A, C, and K; calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, and copper.

Preparation: 

El xoconostle forma parte del mole de olla, un platillo tradicional del país. De igual manera, este puede ser asado o en salsas picantes. También se le puede cristalizar o hacer mermelada.

Basic Facts: 
  • More than 80 percent of xoconostle production comes from San Juan Teotihuacan.
  • The highest consumption and production of the xoconostle is in the Central Highlands of Mexico.
  • It is also known as joconoscle, soconoscle, xoconostle, or xoconostle.
  • Guanajuato is the state that uses the xoconostle the most in its cuisine.
  • Duraznillo, huevo de gato (cat’s egg), joconol, tuna ácida (acid prickly pear fruit), and tuna agria (sour prickly pear fruit) are other names for the xoconostle.
Regions: 
Estos son los Estados con mayor producción de xoconostle en la República Mexicana, durante el 2014:
1. Guanajuato
2. Hidalgo
3. San Luis Potosí
4. Estado de México
Season: 
Se puede encontrar todo el año.
ENE ENE
FEB FEB
MAR MAR
ABR ABR
MAY MAY
JUN JUN
JUL JUL
AGO AGO
SEP SEP
OCT OCT
NOV NOV
DIC DIC

Moderate Production

Abundant Production